Search Indigenous Plant Attributes

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  1. Aloe peglerae

    Aloe peglerae is a very hardy, slow-growing, beautiful Aloe that occurs only on the Witwatersrand and Magaliesburg, but due to fires and the loss of habitat. It is now critically threatened.It has grey-green, toothed leaves that curve inwards making it look like a ball.

    It blooms in July and August bearing spikes of dull-red and yellow flowers with purple stamens.They are densely-packed, very large and robust.Bees and other insects are irresistibly attracted to the pollen and nectar of the flowers.

    It requires minimal water as it normally grows on rocky ledges.Plant in amongst rocks or in very porous containers.

    It requires well-drained soil and full sun.Keep dry in winter.

    size: 40 m

  2. Aloe reitzii

    Aloe reitzii is a very hardy, robust, stemless Aloe that can withstand extreme winters.It grows in a small area across three provinces. It has a single rosette of greyish, blue-green,fleshy leaves with reddish-brown teeth, mostly along their margins.

    Spectacular spikes of brilliant, red, tubular flowers are born in late summer (February to March). The flowers are bright-red above and lemon-yellow below. One flowering spike appears in young plants, but as they mature, more flowering spikes are produced. The nectar- and pollen-rich flowers attract many pollinating insects as well as Sunbirds.

    A striking accent plant for a succulent or grassland garden.

    Plant in well-drained soil, in full sun.

    Size: up to 90 m

  3. Aloe striatula

    Aloe striatula is a very hardy, robust, shrub-like, scrambling Aloe that has attractive, smooth, glossy, dark-green, curved leaves, carried on sturdy stems.

    The spikes of flowers are bright-yellow or orange on unbranched, flowering stems. It flowers from November to March and attracts insects and Sunbirds to the garden.

    An excellent plant for an exclusion zone of a bird garden or planted as a hedge.

    This Aloe can tolerate extremely low temperatures.It will grow in sun or semi-shade.

    Size: 7 to 1m

  4. Crassula arborescens

    Crassula arborescens is a hardy, evergreen, succulent, tree-like Crassula, which is unusual for this genus as they are usually relatively small plants.

    It has a thick, fleshy trunk with smooth, grey-green bark.The leaves are also fleshy and are an attractive, blue-grey colour with a red rim. They have a waxy, powdery bloom which helps to keep them cool.

    The attractive clusters of pink or white flowers are carried in densely-packed, rounded, branched, flowering heads from August to December.The flowers are nectar-rich and attract birds and insects to the garden.

    It has many medicinal uses.This unusual tree makes a great form and container plant.Plant as an element of a rock garden, on slopes or in a succulent garden.Flowers best in full sun but also grows well in semi-shade.

    Plant in well-drained soil.

    Size: up to 3m

  5. Acacia hebeclada

    Acacia hebeclada (=Vachellia hebeclada) is a hardy, small to medium-sized, spreading, deciduous tree or large shrub with paired, sharp spines. The dark brown to grey bark is fissured and flaking.Birds, such as the Red-billed Wood Hoopoe, enjoy probing under the bark for insects.

    The blue-green leaves are hairy and catch the sun. Mostly creamy-white, but sometimes pale-yellow, large, round puffball flowers, are scented and borne in large attractive clusters at the nodes of the leaves.

    They adorn the tree from July to September and offer up a bounty of pollen and nectar to the numerous small pollinating insects and insectivorous birds that visit them. As the shoots age their colour changes giving the crown a lovely mottled look.

    The large, distinctive pods stand upright and persist on the plant for a few seasons, hence the common name ‘Candle Thorn’. An ideal addition to a security hedge because of its height and ferocious thorns.

    It is often referred to as ‘The House of the Lion’ as lions often shelter under it in the hot dry areas where this tree occurs.

    Size: 4 to 7m