Search Indigenous Plant Attributes

Searching for plants with the Traditional medicinal plant tag.

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  1. Croton sylvaticus

    Croton sylvaticus is a semi-hardy, occasionally deciduous trees with a dense crown of attractive large, bicoloured leaves that smell of almonds when crushed.

    The spikes of creamy coloured flowers are carried long stalks are from September to January. Although the flowers are fairly nondescript they are followed by long bunches of apricot-orange coloured fruit that adorn the tree for many months.

    Plant in well-drained soil in a protected position.

    The seeds attract birds and it is also an important butterfly host plant.

    Size: 7 to 13m

  2. Argyrolobium tomentosum

    Argyrolobium tomentosum is a hardy, evergreen shrub that can be scrambling or upright. The trifoliate leaves are an attractive feature of this shrub.

    The bright, yellow pea-like flowers are orange or red as they age and are borne profusely in spring and summer although there are a few flowers all year round.

    It attracts insects and birds to the garden.

    It is used extensively as a medicinal plant.

    Use as a screen or a small bushy shrub in a mixed border or allow to scramble up trees where its bright-yellow flowers will brighten up a shady bed.

    Plant in semi-shade and prune once a year to keep in shape. It only requires moderate watering once established.

    Size: 0.6

  3. Clivia robusta

    Clivia robusta is a fairly hardy, evergreen perennial with dark, strap-shaped leaves.

    It sends out side shoots to form quite large robust clumps that can reach up to 1.6m tall and produce buttress roots.

  4. Spirostachys africana

    Spirostachys africana is a hardy, deciduous to semi deciduous, medium sized, tree with a dense round crown. It has distinctive, dark, thick, rough bark cracked into rectangular sections which helps to identify the tree. The foliage turns beautiful yellow to deep red in autumn. Small spikes of pinkish flowers are borne from July to Sept. before the new leaves appear. These are followed by fruit, which splits explosively.

    It attracts birds and many animals that feed off the fallen leaves. It is host to a moth larva, which causes the seeds that it has parasitized to jump around on the ground.

    It is extensively used as a medicinal plant, but the sap and smoke from the wood is poisonous. The wood is prized for furniture making and pieces can be used as an insect repellant.

    Plant in sun or semi-shade, in well-drained soil.

    Size: 4 to 8m

  5. Markhamia zanzibarica

    Markhamia zanzibarica is a fairly hardy, small, evergreen Bushveld tree with smooth or rough grey bark. It has compound, glossy, fresh green leaves. The really attractive feature of this small tree is its beautiful, bell-shaped, yellow and deep maroon flowers that are borne in clusters from September to February. They are followed by long, twisted pods (40cm) that turn dark brown. This is a significant feature of this tree.

    Flowers attracts pollinating insects to the garden.

    Plant in well-drained, well-composted soil, in sun or semi-shade.

    Size: Up to 6m