Search Indigenous Plant Attributes

Searching for plants with the Nectar rich flowers tag.

Please input one or more keywords (separated by spaces) and then click the search button.

Search Result:


  1. Schotia brachypetala

    Schotia brachypetala is a hardy, semi-deciduous (deciduous in cold areas), very decorative tree with interesting branching patterns and a rugged look. The bark is rough and grey. The beautiful foliage is bronze when it first flushes and goes through many different colours and textures in the different seasons.

    From August to November it bears massed bunches of magnificent scarlet-red cup-like flowers filled with so much nectar that it drips out, hence the common name. The flowers attract all manner of birds. Some, like Sunbirds, will sip the nectar. Others, like Weavers, will make holes in the bottoms of the flowers and rob them of their nectar without pollinating them. The flowers also attract a whole host of insects. The pods, that are initially bright-green with a dark margin, turn beautiful glossy brown.

    The large seeds are edible after they have been roasted and have been used as a coffee substitute. The pods and seeds readily absorb fragrant oils and so are included in potpourri. It has many medicinal and traditional uses.

    An excellent and ornamental garden subject for sun or semi-shade and one of our most beautiful and shapely trees. Suitable for containers and bonsai.

    Size: 3 to 16m

  2. Kalanchoe rotundifolia Signal Red

    Kalanchoe rotundifolia is a hardy, evergreen, erect succulent groundcover. The petioles are pink and the edges of the leaves are pinkish-red.

    It bears spikes of small tubular bright orange to red flowers on branched flowering stems from March to December.

    The nectar-rich flowers attract many butterflies and other pollinating insects

    Plant in amongst grasses or as an element of a rocky succulent garden.

    Size: up to 50cm when in flower.

  3. Greyia sutherlandii

    Greyia sutherlandii is a hardy, deciduous, drought resistant, rugged looking shrub or small tree with attractive round leaves that turn bright red in autumn. The tree is often still leafless when it starts to bear densely packed spikes of magnificent, brilliant red flowers at the tips of the branches from August to October. When blooming en masse they are a sight never to be forgotten.

    The flowers are rich in nectar, which attracts sunbirds and insects to the garden. The dead leaves often persist on the tree and should be removed to gain the full benefit of the flowers.

    Makes a good container plant and a wonderful tree for a small garden. The soft pale pink wood is used for household items.

    Plant in a sunny or semi-shade position, in well-drained soil. Thrives in rocky soils.

    Size: Up to 7m

  4. Euphorbia ingens

    Euphorbia ingens is a hardy, massive, tree-like succulent with a dense crown and a dark green stem. The branches have 4 wing-like angles with spines on the wing margins. The plant is shaped like a hot-air balloon. The yellow-green flowers are clustered around the spines from April to July and attract bees, butterflies and insects and are followed by reddish to purple fruit, which are relished by birds.

    Birds will nest in this tree. Hole-nesting birds will nest in dead sections. This very drought-resistant tree makes a good container plant or accent plant in a succulent garden but must have well-drained soil.

    Where the tree is damaged it will exude milky sap which is poisonous and can cause extreme skin irritation. This plant has many traditional and medicinal uses.

    Plant in sun to semi-shade, in extremely well drained soil.

    Size: up to 7,5m