Search Indigenous Plant Attributes

Searching for plants with the Moth host plant tag.

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  1. Volkameria glabra

    Volkameria glabra (=Clerodendrum glabrum)  is a very hardy, semi-deciduous, fast-growing, small tree or large shrub with a dense crown. It has shiny, dark-green leaves that are pungent when crushed.

    From December to June it bears profuse, dense clusters of white to pinkish flowers that have long stamens. In some specimens the flowers are wonderfully scented, whilst in others the scent can be pungent.These are followed by tightly packed yellowish-white berries that attract birds to the garden.

    An important host plant of moths and butterflies – an absolute must for a butterfly garden. The flowers also attract a whole host of pollinating insects and the nectar in the flowers is an important food source for bees.

    It is extensively used for medicinal and traditional purposes.

    Plant in sun or semi-shade in well-composted soil.

    Size: 2 to 6m

  2. Brachylaena rotundata

    Brachylaena rotundata is a hardy, semi-deciduous to deciduous, medium sized, drought resistant tree or large shrub with slender, drooping branches and corky bark. The attractive, leathery, silver-grey foliage is covered with cobwebby hairs especially when the leaves are young.

    In autumn the leaves get a reddish tinge.

    The tree is covered in yellow thistle-like flowers from August to September (the male and female flowers are on separate trees).

    It is host to the moth Phyllonorycter brachylaenae.

    Excellent garden subject.

    Plant in sun or semi-shade, in well drained soil.

    Size: 4 to 5m S.A. No. 730

  3. Spirostachys africana

    Spirostachys africana is a hardy, deciduous to semi deciduous, medium sized, tree with a dense round crown. It has distinctive, dark, thick, rough bark cracked into rectangular sections which helps to identify the tree. The foliage turns beautiful yellow to deep red in autumn. Small spikes of pinkish flowers are borne from July to Sept. before the new leaves appear. These are followed by fruit, which splits explosively.

    It attracts birds and many animals that feed off the fallen leaves. It is host to a moth larva, which causes the seeds that it has parasitized to jump around on the ground.

    It is extensively used as a medicinal plant, but the sap and smoke from the wood is poisonous. The wood is prized for furniture making and pieces can be used as an insect repellant.

    Plant in sun or semi-shade, in well-drained soil.

    Size: 4 to 8m