Search Indigenous Plant Attributes

Searching for plants with the Indoor plant tag.

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  1. Cunonia capensis

    Cunonia capensis is a hardy, evergreen, fast growing, small to medium sized tree.

    The beautiful compound leaves have red petioles and large, red, spoon-shaped stipules that give the tree an overall reddish look and make this a beautiful foliage plant.

    It blooms profusely with white, sweetly scented, upright ‘bottlebrush’ flowers from February to May that attract a myriad of insects and butterflies. The fruit attracts birds to the garden.

    A handsome tree and good garden subject, which needs a cool, moist area.

  2. Deinbollia oblongifolia

    Deinbollia oblongifolia is a hardy, briefly deciduous, shrub or small tree with large decorative, dark green leaves crowded at the ends of the branches.

    The pyramids of white flowers, which stand out above the leaves, are borne from March to June and are followed by white, fruit that is much favoured by birds.

    Lichens readily grow on the bark giving it a lovely mottled effect.

    One of the best plants for attracting butterflies, moths, other insects and birds to the garden.

    An attractive garden plant for shady areas that also makes a good container plant for indoors.

    Traditionally the seeds are used to make soap, the leaves eaten as spinach and the roots used medicinally.

    Size 1.5

  3. Dracaena aletriformis

    Dracaena aletriformis is a fairly hardy, evergreen, shade loving, Yucca-like accent plant.

  4. Celtis mildbraedii

    Celtis mildbraedii is a fairly hardy, evergreen, medium-sized to large, slow-growing tree with light brown bark that flakes off in discs and contrasts beautifully with the leaves. The stem becomes fluted with buttress roots over time. As it is quite a slow-growing tree, the fluting could take time in cultivation.  The glossy, leathery leaves are a lovely dark almost bluish-green.

    The small, inconspicuous flowers are borne from August to April and are followed by red, fleshy fruits which attract birds.

    Taking into account that my trees are planted in a protected position, they have never been affected by frost even though we have occasionally had black frost, so I think they are a lot hardier than most people think. This is one of the rarest trees in South Africa and maybe in the world.

    It thrives in very low light conditions and can be used successfully as an indoor plant.

    Plant in well-composted soil in a shady position.

    Size: Up to 30m